Thursday, May 28, 2009

The Flow


Lately in my WIP I have been searching for that elusive 'flow,' the writing zone where everything becomes clear, the words flow effortlessly, the story unfolds before me while I watch.
And what have I gotten instead? Drip, drip, drip. Slow, sporadic, annoying. I've pecked at my story, fighting through this tortoise phase, waiting for something to spark the story.
I found that spark last week while reading Seekerville. Camy Tang, all around terrific woman (and author of the great LI Suspense novel I'm reading right now - more about that at a later date, but tune in, you might win a copy of Deadly Intent) quoted a phrase used by Randy Ingermanson. "Dialogue is WAR."
Guess why I was having such a hard time with this scene? No CONFLICT. I needed to get my characters from here to there, and I needed to show them on the journey because a couple epiphanal thoughts occur to my hero and heroine, but on the way, not much was happening to keep things interesting.
Today, I mixed things up, changed things on my characters, and loaded in lots of sub-texting. Words flowed. More than 3 thousand words. I was in the flow of the story, and I was both enjoying the writing and what I had written.
So, how about you? Have you read or heard something this past week that opened your mind and let the words flow? Did you find some project to do that really expressed how you were feeling?
When was the last time you were really in the flow?
Don't forget the 700 Blog Post Giveaway which ends June 5th. You can't win if you don't play!

9 comments:

  1. I just thought of something. If an author doesn't have a conflict, there's no story! I'm working on a new project, but find I get annoyed when I have to get out of the work zone because other obligations are nagging me.

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  2. There's nothing I love more than being in the flow! Congrats on the 3K! That's so awesome! Camy Tang's dialogue is war posts on seekerville were excellent!

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  3. I really enjoy your posts about the whole process of writing and getting your books published. I never would have stopped to think how much work actually goes into writing a book.

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  4. This week I read a post about using the senses. Lately I've been doing well with dialogue and trying to keep conflict in my scenes but description has been poor. I realized I could use more imagery and some really strong verbs in description and actions (this was also pointed out by my critique partner). So I read that post about using the senses and realize I don't use all of them or really ANY of them enough. I am working on that.

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  5. Oo, I'm glad you found the key! Since I haven't been writing the last few weeks, when I started yesterday it was totally drippy. Maybe today I can have a waterfall like you :)

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  6. Congrats! Flow is fantastic! I'm jealous. lol I'm in the drip drip drip stage right now. Come on, waterfall!!

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  7. I read something yesterday by another author (interview in WORLD Magazine) who was told he needed to write four hours a day or it just wouldn't be worth the effort to try a book. Yikes! I struggle to prattle away at the keyboard on a blog for 15-20 minutes, hoping it will at least flow like molasses in January in Minnesota and make sense for an audience of one. Flow? Flow? Floe was the name of my aunt in Iowa.

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  8. Yahoo! I'm so happy you found the flow. I love that feeling! I finished my latest and greatest first draft last week, so this week I'm sweeping up the other writing things I've fallen behind on.

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  9. I love that picture! There's nothing better than tension and conflict to get the drip into a flow! Sounds like it was really flowing for you! I can't remember ever having that kind of day. Mine are usually more like a steady trickle.

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