Sunday, January 29, 2012

The Places In My Head

When I was a little girl, my mother despaired of getting me to spend time in the real world. I was so far away somewhere in my head most of the time, I had a hard time paying attention to what was going on around me.

This past Sunday, a sweet woman at my church asked if ideas for novels ever came into my head when I was in church.

Um...yes. I haven't really changed much since I was a little girl. I still have a hard time focusing on things in the real world when my imaginary world calls. I can zone out in the middle of a conversation, a sermon, a tv show.

I lead a very vivid internal life. At the moment, most of my daydreams revolve around a hotel and a high desert and honor. And at any second, my mind will leave the real world and return there.

So, my question for today is: Are you a daydreamer? Have you been known to check out of a conversation or sermon or meeting in favor of a fictional world?

And in a side-note, I'm blogging over at The Writer's Alley (hosted by a bunch of super-sweet gals and great writers all) about handling changes in the publishing industry. http://thewritersalleys.blogspot.com/

14 comments:

  1. You sound EXACTLY like me. I've recently been diagnosed with hearing loss, and I'm pretty sure it's from the people stomping through my head all the time.

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  2. Yep. In fact, I usually have two notebooks with me at church. One for sermon notes and one for stuff that's rolling around in my head. Because if I don't scribble it down, it won't leave me alone until I do and then I can't focus on what pastor is saying.

    I wrote a blog post that way one day - the sermon related to it and to a book I was supposed to be reviewing. I also took 3 pages of sermon notes though so it wasn't like I was ignoring him ;). But otherwise, I'd be writing it in my head and not paying attention...

    And yes, I did point my pastor to the post when I asked to use a bit of his sermon in a book.

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  3. It must be part of the DNA of a writer. I'm the same way. I believe we're also blessed with the What If gene.

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  4. Same here. Some of my best ideas come to me when I'm supposed to be listening to someone else. Jotting down notes while listening to a friend talk isn't rude...right? ;)

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  5. Yes!!! But the scariest thing for me is doing it while I am driving! It's like I get from Point A to Point B and have no recollection of it! SCARY!

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  6. Always happy to check out of a sermon or meeting if they are boring.

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  7. I zoned out so much in English class in high school, my teacher asked me (in front of everyone)if I was taking drugs.

    Yep, I'm a check out of life, daydream kind of girl too. Again, so much in common! :)

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  8. Definitely. Sermons always make me start thinking about whatever story I'm working on - not because the sermon is boring but because I'm always thinking about how my character would respond to it. At home I'll be staring into space, and my husband will say, "Are you okay?" I always tell him I'm working. :)

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  9. Guilty! But usually what happens is the pastor will say something and I'll think, "This would be a great spiritual arc for my character!" and then I'll start to drift. I've been known to take notes on the bulletin.

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  10. Absolutely. As far as I'm concerned these two worlds run parallel.

    The better to see our characters with.
    ~ Wendy

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  11. LOL!!! Funny you should say this. My boss will have to snap his fingers sometimes at me during meetings to catch me up to the "real world". My brain wanders into imaginary places on a regular basis!

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  12. My pastor spent a year preaching out of the book of Acts--my favorite. A YEAR! Halfway through, I got a novel idea (my first novel, even) and started working.

    And then I had to sit and listen to HALF A YEAR's worth of sermons, all chock-full of other novel ideas? Yeah, I would call myself guilty of daydreaming about stories (even making notes about them!) in church!

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  13. I love this post and all of the comments. You make me realize that 1) I'm not alone in this behavior that has so often been frowned on and 2) It's actually a good thing!!

    Thanks Erica, and the rest of you!!!

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  14. And in case any of you dear friends of Erica's don't really believe, I'm here to testify how she can daydream, giggle, keep track of her son, giggle, make sure her husband isn't trying to make her laugh with something from the hymnal, giggle and still try listening to my sermons (and giggle a bit more at some of my blunders from the pulpit... "Did I really say, 'more greater'?")

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